Shopachu – Incogna’s new visual product browser

In the back half of last year visual search outfit Incogna released their visual shopping browser Shopachu. I’ve followed some of Incogna’s previous releases so I thought I’d share some thoughts on this one too.

What does it do?

This site has a very similar model to our own consumer-facing MAST app; Empora. It makes money by sending consumers to retailer sites, who for obvious reasons are willing to pay for suitable traffic. The main forces that influence the design of a site like this are retention, and the clickthrough and conversion rates of your traffic:

Retention – you need to impress people, then ideally remind them to come back to you

Clickthrough – you need to send a good proportion of visitors to retailers in order to make money

Conversion – if the visitors you send aren’t interested in buying the clicked product then the retailers won’t want to pay for that traffic on a per-click basis (although they might be interested in the CPA model, which doesn’t pay until someone buys)

First Impressions

People’s first impressions are usually determined by a combination of design and how well a site conforms to their expectations. I’ve probably got distorted expectations considering my experience working with this type of application, but in that respect I was pleasantly surprised; Shopachu has some good features and makes them known. In terms of design I was less impressed, the icons and gel effects don’t seem to fit and I think there are whitespace and emphasis issues (sorry guys, trying to be constructive).

Finding stuff

It’s fairly easy to find things on Shopachu. The filters are easy to use (although I could get the brand filter to work, could be a glitch). The navigation is pretty easy, although it doesn’t currently provide second generation retail search features like facet counts (i.e. showing the number of products in a category before you click on it).

The biggest interesting technological problem I’ve noticed with their navigation is the colour definitions. There’s a big difference between a colour being present in an image, and the eye interpreting that colour as being present in an image. I think there are some improvements to be made in the way colours are attributed to images (e.g. here I’ve applied a pink filter but am seeing products with no pink returned). Similarly there’ll be another marked improvement with better background removal (e.g. here I’d applied a light blue filter and am seeing products with blue backgrounds).

Similarity search

Shopachu’s similarity search is quite different to Empora’s.  They’ve chosen to opt for maximum simplicity in the interface rather than user control, resulting in a single set of similarity search results. In contrast, Empora allows users to determine whether they’re interested in colour similarity, or shape similarity, or both. Simplicity often wins over functionality (iPod example #yawn) so it’ll be interesting to see how they do.

Another issue is the quality of the input data. This challenge is the same for Empora, or anyone else aggregating data from third parties, in that category information is inconsistent. One effect of this is that when looking at the similarity results for an often poorly-classified item like a belt you may also see jewellery or other items that have been classified as “accessories” or “miscellaneous” in the retailer’s data, another effect is that you often see duplicate items.

Keeping the traffic quality high

An interesting design decision for me is that the default image action on Shopachu is a similarity search, i.e when you click on the image it takes you to an internal page featuring more information and similar products. This is in contrast to the default action on Empora or Like.com, which is to send the visitor to the retailer’s product page.

The design trade-off here is between clickthrough and conversion rates. If you make it easy to get to the retailer your clickthrough rate goes up, but run the risk of a smaller proportion converting from a visit to a purchase. Here Shopachu are reducing that risk (and also the potential up-side) by keeping visitors on their site until they explicitly signal the intent to buy (the user has to click “buy” before they’re allowed through to the retailer).

Getting people hooked

There are a few features on Shopachu aimed at retention, namely Price Alerts and the ability to save outfits (Polyvore style). These features seem pretty usable, although I think they’re still lacking that level of polish that inspires passionate users. I’d be interested to know what the uptake statistics look like.

In summary

I think this implementation shows that Incogna have thought about all the right problems, and I think have clearly got the capability to solve the technological issues. On the down-side; cleaning up retailer’s data is a tough business which will be time-consuming, and I think they need to find a little inspiration on the visual design side.

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One Response to Shopachu – Incogna’s new visual product browser

  1. Kris says:

    Thanks for all the great feedback! You’ve reconstructed our to-do list pretty accurately, we’ll be rolling out some changes related to this stuff in the next while.

    As for the “search vs refer” default click action, we explored that question quite in depth. Users don’t seem to expect a “find similar” option to even be available, and we want people to try that above all else. If you find them the right product, they’ll click “buy”.

    And yes, retailer data leaves…a lot to be desired.

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